Perfect Little World

Kevin Wilson

See more book details

Picador

9781509820672
368
Synopsis

Aren't the best families the ones we make for ourselves?

Isabelle Pool is fresh out of high school, pregnant with her art teacher's baby, and totally on her own. Izzy knows she can be a good mother but without any money or family to fall back on, she's left searching.

So when she's offered a space in The Infinite Family Project - a utopian ideal funded by an eccentric billionaire - she accepts. Isabelle joins nine other couples, all with children the same age as her newborn son, to raise their children as one extended family in a spacious, secluded compound in Tennessee. But can this experiment really work - or is their 'perfect little world' destined to go horribly wrong?

In the media
Like an animated Edward Gorey cartoon, with a more realistic contemporary setting and a warmer, lighter touch ... Wilson pulls off his sweet-and-tart tone with a soupcon of unexpected spice.

Washington Post

Kevin Wilson knows how to construct a story ... It's a novel to keep reading for old-fashioned reasons – because it's a good story, and you need to know what happens. But you also keep reading because you want to know what a good family is. Everyone wants to know that.

John Irving The New York Times

The author of The Family Fang invents another unusual family structure for his sweet and thoroughly satisfying second novel…Wilson grounds his premise in credible human motivations and behavior, resulting in a memorable cast of characters. He uses his intriguing premise to explore the meaning of family and the limits of rational decision making.

Publisher's Weekly

Kevin Wilson’s second book has a premise so offbeat and complicated that it’s difficult to explain but seems completely natural when you’re in the midst of it. The sheer energy of imagination in Wilson’s work makes other writers of realistic fiction look lazy. The novel's grand finale reminds us that not everything unpredictable is painful or bad, and that conventional arrangements have no monopoly on the profound connections that make family.

Newsday