Cape Town's biggest literary festival is back!

Are you looking for something cool to do in Cape Town this week? Why not head out to Open Book Festival! With a wide range of events for young and old, it's bound to be a trip worth your while!


04/09/2019
3 minutes to read
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Running for five days, this year's Open Book Festival is taking place from 4 to 8 September. And will feature book launches, workshops, performances and panel discussions. Get some food, buy books and get them signed by your favourite author. This is the time to let you inner fan flourish!

Here are Pan Macmillan authors who will be at the festival: Fiona Snyckers, Khaya Dlanga, Rekgotsofetse Chikane, Mcebisi Jonas, Mohale Mashigo, Dr Tlaleng Mofokeng, Rebecca Davis, Sarah Wild, kid's author Refiloe Moahloli and Cassava Republic's Sarah Ladipo Manyika. 


Download the full programme here
Tickets are available on Webtickets. See you there!

Dr T

by Tlaleng Mofokeng

Book cover for Dr T

The indomitable Dr Tlaleng Mofokeng – affectionately known as Dr T – is passionate about making sexual health and well-being services available to all, regardless of their sexual and gender identities and their economic status.

This book is filled with the specifics of sexual anatomy and health as well as advice and facts about pleasure and sexual rights. Dr T, with her typically honest and warm approach, makes the reader feel comfortable reading about topics that are not always discussed freely, providing ALL the information that demystifies sex and sexuality in a way that is entertaining and enlightening.

These Things Really do Happen to Me

by Khaya Dlanga

Book cover for These Things Really do Happen to Me

Some people know Khaya Dlanga as a highly regarded marketing professional, who has worked for several advertising agencies and global-chip companies, but most people know Khaya as a collector and teller of stories. From his early vlogs to his lively discussions on various social media platforms, Khaya’s words have shown us how we all have stories to share and how stories can bring people together.

In These Things Really Do Happen To Me, Khaya describes everyday experiences that have shaped his life. He recounts amusing anecdotes – from chasing horses as a child in rural Transkei, to the time he fell asleep next to President Thabo Mbeki – as well as moving stories, such as meeting his sister for the first time and only time. Not one to shy away from heavyweight topics, Khaya also shares why conversations about race are not controversial, what his feelings on feminism are, why we must bring back small talk, and how to take a sneaky break when your family is working you too hard.

Breaking a Rainbow, Building a Nation

by Rekgotsofetse Chikane

Book cover for Breaking a Rainbow, Building a Nation

Breaking a Rainbow, Building a Nation is a first-hand account of the university protests that gripped South Africa between 2015 and 2017, widely better known as the #FeesMustFall. Chikane outlines the nature of student politics in the country before, during and after the emergence of #MustFall politics, exploring the political dynamics that informed and drove the student protests, and the effect that these #MustFall movements have had on the nature of youth politics in the country.

Chikane looks at how the current nature of youth politics is different from previous youth upheavals that have defined South Africa, specifically due to the fact that the protests were being led by so-called coconuts, who are part of the black elite.

Breaking a Rainbow, Building a Nation poses the provocative question, can coconuts be trusted with the revolution?

South Africa's Survival Guide to Climate Change

by Sipho Kings

Book cover for South Africa's Survival Guide to Climate Change

This is a survival guide. It rests on the idea that we could possibly survive a changing climate. Temperatures are already climbing, sea levels are rising and parts of South Africa are on their way to being uninhabitable. Life is already incredibly hard for many people and nobody will be exempt from climate change. Circumstances are going to get a lot more difficult very soon, and we need a plan.

This is a practical handbook that explores what climate change is likely to mean for us as South Africans, how we can prepare for it, and how we can – in our everyday lives – help to mitigate the impacts it will have.

Lacuna

by Fiona Snyckers

Book cover for Lacuna

Lucy Lurie is deeply sunk in PTSD following a gang rape at her father’s farmhouse in the Western Cape. She becomes obsessed with the author John Coetzee, who has made a name for himself by writing Disgrace, a celebrated novel that revolves around the attack on her. Lucy lives the life of a celibate hermit, making periodic forays into the outside world in her attempts to find and confront Coetzee.
The Lucy of Coetzee’s fictional imaginings is a passive, peaceful creature, almost entirely lacking in agency. She is the lacuna in Coetzee’s novel – the missing piece of the puzzle.

Lucy Lurie is no one’s lacuna. Her attempts to claw back her life, her voice and her agency may be messy and misguided, but she won’t be silenced. Her rape is not a metaphor. This is her story.

After Dawn

by Mcebisi Jonas

Book cover for After Dawn

In October 2015, the Gupta brothers offered Mcebisi Jonas the position of minister of finance in exchange for R600 million. Then deputy minister of finance, Jonas turned down the bribe and a period of deep introspection followed for him. How did we reach this point, and what did the future hold for South Africa’s democracy and the economy?

In After Dawn, Mcebisi Jonas analyses the crisis at the heart of our current system, which places politics at the centre of policymaking and implementation at the expense of growth. In this important and authoritative book, Jonas first unpacks and analyses the current badlands of the South African economic and political landscape.
In the second half, Jonas proposes a series of workable and practical solutions for transitioning South Africa into a growing, job-creating country including:

  • Putting inclusive growth at the centre of economic policy;
  • rapidly expanding new technological capacities and knowledge to transition to a twenty-first-century economy;
  • expanding human capabilities at scale;
  • path-changing trade-offs to catalyse the next phase of South Africa’s development;
  • nurturing a corruption-free, high-performance state built on meritocracy and innovation; and
  • changing the nature of politics.

Time is of the essence and the window of opportunity is narrowing for all South Africans to work together towards the South Africa we all imagined was possible in 1994.

The Yearning

by Mohale Mashigo

Book cover for The Yearning

How long does it take for scars to heal? How long does it take for a scarred memory to fester and rise to the surface? For Marubini, the question is whether scars ever heal when you forget they are there to begin with.

Marubini is a young woman who has an enviable life in Cape Town, working at a wine farm and spending idyllic days with her friends ... until her past starts spilling into her present.

Something dark has been lurking in the shadows of Marubini’s life from as far back as she can remember. It’s only a matter of time before it reaches out and grabs at her.

The Yearning is a memorable exploration of the ripple effects of the past, of personal strength and courage, and of the shadowy intersections of traditional and modern worlds.

Self-helpless

by Rebecca Davis

Book cover for Self-helpless

Everywhere Rebecca Davis looked, the world was in poor shape. And because she’d quit drinking, she no longer had the comfort blanket of alcohol to tamp down her anxiety. How did sober people stay sane?

In recent times, the self-help industry has exploded into a multi-billion dollar global industry – and along with it has come every imaginable type of therapy, healing or general woo-woo. In the past, Rebecca scoffed at this industry, mocking its reliance on half-baked science and the way it appears to prey on the mentally fragile.

But as she searched for a meaning of life that did not involve booze, she found it increasingly hard to rationalize her default scepticism. This shit really seems to work for some people, she reasoned. And it’s not like I have any particularly solid alternatives.

Rebecca lives in Cape Town, the undisputed epicentre of ‘alternative’ paths to peace and enlightenment in South Africa. She decided that over the course of a year, she would embark on a quest for personal wellness, spiritual enlightenment and good old-fashioned happiness. She was willing, within reason, to try anything. She would open herself to even the most outlandish contemporary fads in self-improvement.

What followed was a twelve-month immersion in the world of auras, chakras, hallucinogenic drugs, sweat lodges, sangomas, past lives and more.

And by the end of it? Maybe she would find some new ways of thinking and living. Or maybe she would emerge with her prejudices untouched. Either way, it would be a good story.