Attached

Amir Levine

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Bluebird

9781529032178
304
Synopsis

'A groundbreaking book that redefines what it means to be in a relationship.' John Gray, PhD., bestselling author of Men Are from Mars, Women Are from Venus

Is there a science to love? In this groundbreaking book, psychiatrist and neuroscientist Amir Levine and psychologist Rachel S. F. Heller reveal how an understanding of attachment theory – the most advanced relationship science in existence today – can help us find and sustain love.

Pioneered by psychologist John Bowlby in the 1950s, the field of attachment explains that each of us behaves in relationships in one of three distinct ways:

Anxious people are often preoccupied with their relationships and tend to worry about their partner’s ability to love them back.

Avoidant people equate intimacy with a loss of independence and constantly try to minimize closeness.

Secure people feel comfortable with intimacy and are usually warm and loving.

With fascinating psychological insight, quizzes and case studies, Dr Amir Levine and Rachel Heller help you understand the three attachment styles, identify your own and recognize the styles of others so that you can find compatible partners or improve your existing relationship. An insightful look at the science behind love, Attached offers readers a road map for building stronger, more fulfilling connections.

In the media
A groundbreaking book that redefines what it means to be in a relationship.

John Gray, PhD., bestselling author of Men Are from Mars, Women Are from Venus

Chock-full of tips, questionnaires, and case studies, this is a solidly researched and intriguing approach to the perennial trials of looking for love in all the right places and improving existing relationships.

Publishers Weekly

A practical, enjoyable guide to forming rewarding romantic relationships.

Kirkus Reviews

Amir Levine and Rachel Heller have written a very smart book: It is clear, easy to read and insightful. It's a valuable tool whether you are just entering a relationship with a new partner or – as in my case – even after you've been married twenty-one years, and had thought you knew everything about your spouse.

Scientific American